Magnesium Aspartate Hydrochloride

 

Even a healthy mixed diet is today no guarantee of an optimal magnesium supply.

This inadequacy of magnesium in natural ingredients is due to magnesium depletion in agriculturally productive land and of the plants growing on it.

Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body. About 60 percent is found in the bones and teeth; 28 percent is in the muscles, liver and other soft tissues; and 2 percent is in the body fluids.

It is essential to build bones and teeth and numerous metabolic functions; magnesium is also an ingredient in some antacids and laxatives and is used to prevent premature birth as well as to treat certain types of convulsions and rapid heartbeats (tachycardia).

Magnesium Aspartate Hydrochloride is easily ionizable and hence more bio-available form of magnesium supplement. Recognized as a nutritional supplement in Magnesium therapy Magnesium Aspartate Hydrochloride is a safe, well-tolerated and better-retained form with the additional advantage of supplementing an energy rich substrate.

Structure

Requirements

The Food and Nutrition Board of the Institute of Medicine of the United States National Academy of Sciences has recommended the following Adequate Intake (AI) and Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) values for magnesium:

Age (Year)

AI (milligrams/day)

Infants

0 – 6 months

30

7 – 12 months

75

Children

RDA (milligrams/day)

1 – 3 years

80

4 – 8 years

130

Boys

9 – 13 years

240

4 – 18 years

410

Girls

9 – 13 years

240

4 – 18 years

360

Men

19 – 30 years

400

31 – 70 + years

420

Women

19 – 30 years

310

31 – 70 + years

320

Pregnancy

14 – 18 years

400

19 – 30 years

350

31 – 50 years

380

Lactation

14 – 18 years

360

19 – 30 years

310

31 – 50 years

320

Stress and Magnesium

There are many evidences to show that there are several diseases, representing stresses of varying intensity. It is reported that stress induces the general adaptation syndrome comprising of three stages.

1. Alarm reaction

2. Resistance situation

3. Exhaustion

Under both physical (i.e. exertion, heat, cold, accidental or surgical trauma, burns) and emotional (i.e. pain, anxiety, excitement or depression) stress, a magnesium deficiency can itself act as stress factor. Magnesium deficiency can induce the stages of alarm reaction, resistance and exhaustion or decrease the resistance during an alarm reaction.

Long-lasting stress situations result in a decreased release of various stress hormones such as thyroid hormones or hormones of the adrenal cortex. These hormones have the effect of increasing the excretion of magnesium with urine. The liver especially requires a sufficient magnesium supply under stress because many enzymes of important metabolic pathways in the liver are magnesium dependent and magnesium is necessary in the liver in order to cover the high-energy requirement caused by stress.

Moreover, stress decreases the insulin level in the blood (insulin: hormone of the Pancreas involved in the regulation of the protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism) and increases taurine excretion (taurine: supports among others the positive effects of calcium in the human body) via urine.

In stress situations the calcium effect is increased in the case of magnesium deficiency. An increased calcium influx into the glandular tissue leads to an increased release of stress hormones and thus to a magnesium depletion in various tissues (e.g. heart, liver). All these factors lead to stress-induced loss of magnesium. This causes a vicious cycle between magnesium deficiency and stress, i.e., a lack of magnesium increases susceptibility to stress and stress in turn leads to magnesium deficiency.

Symptoms

Symptoms and signs of magnesium deficiency include anorexia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, generalized muscle spasticity, paresthesias, confusion, tremor, focal and generalized seizures, confusion, loss of coordination, cardiac arrhythmias, laboratory abnormalities, such as hypokalemia and coronary and cerebral vasospasms. Magnesium deficiency may be found in diabetes mellitus, malabsorption syndromes, alcoholism and hyperthyroidism, among other disorders.

Functions of Magnesium

Recent research indicates that magnesium deficiency may be a factor in the development of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease – the major cause of heart attacks.

Magnesium works with calcium and phosphorus to build strong bones and teeth;

It also plays important roles in the following functions:

Normal metabolism: Magnesium activates many enzymes and works with others to carry out some three hundred metabolic functions, including protein digestion and synthesis, energy production, and the synthesis of insulin.

Proper nerve and muscle function: Magnesium is needed to transmit nerve impulses; it also allows muscles to relax after contraction, a critical factor in heart function.

Stimulating calcium function: By acting as a calcium antagonist, it balances the role of calcium in regulating the heartbeat and other functions.

Preventing dental cavities: Magnesium strengthens dental enamel and makes the teeth less vulnerable to decay.

Miscellaneous other functions: Promotes immunity, makes DNA, and boosts the actions of potassium and some of the B vitamins. It may also aid in the treatment of asthma, cardiac arrhythmia, high blood pressure, fibromyalgia, and diabetes.

Uses

In addition to its use for the treatment of hypomagnesemia, magnesium is used for the treatment of certain cardiac arrhythmias, in particular torsade de points, and eclampsia. It is also used as a laxative and antacid. Magnesium may also have value for the prevention of osteoporosis and for the management of migraine headaches in some. There is preliminary evidence that magnesium may help some with premenstrual syndrome, Type II diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and hypertension.